Special Olympics Allegheny County
404 First Street
Heidelberg, PA 15106
P: (412) 279-5450
F: (412) 279-5451
specialolympicsallco@verizon.net
Thu Jun 06 @11:00AM
SOPA Summer Games
Fri Jun 07 @11:00AM
SOPA Summer Games
Sat Jun 08 @11:00AM
SOPA Summer Games
Sun Aug 11 @11:00AM
SOPA Multi-Sports Training Camp
Mon Aug 12 @11:00AM
SOPA Multi-Sports Training Camp
Tue Aug 13 @11:00AM
SOPA Multi-Sports Training Camp
Wed Aug 14 @11:00AM
SOPA Multi-Sports Training Camp
Thu Aug 15 @11:00AM
SOPA Multi-Sports Training Camp
Fri Aug 16 @11:00AM
SOPA Multi-Sports Training Camp
Sat Aug 17 @11:00AM
SOPA Multi-Sports Training Camp

The Mission of Special Olympics

To provide year-round sports training and athletic competition in a variety of Olympic-type sports for children and adults with intellectual disabilities, giving them continuing opportunities to develop physical fitness, demonstrate courage, experience joy and participate in a sharing of gifts, skills and friendship with their families, other Special Olympics athletes and the community.

Philosophy

Special Olympics is founded on the belief that people with intellectual disabilities can, with proper instruction and encouragement, learn, enjoy and benefit from participation in individual and team sports.

Special Olympics believes that consistent training is essential to the development of sports skills, and that competition among those of equal abilities is the most appropriate means of testing these skills, measuring progress and providing incentives for personal growth.

Special Olympics believes that through sports training and competition, people with intellectual disabilities benefit physically, mentally, socially and spiritually; families are strengthened; and the community at large, both through participation and observation, is united in understanding people with intellectual disabilities an environment of equality, respect and acceptance.

History

Special Olympics began in 1968 when Eunice Kennedy Shriver organized the First International Special Olympics Games at Soldier Field, Chicago, Illinois, USA. The concept was born in the early 1960s when Shriver started a day camp for people with intellectual disabilities. She saw that individuals with intellectual disabilities were far more capable in sports and physical activities than many experts thought. Since 1968, millions of children and adults with intellectual disabilities have participated in Special Olympics.